Views of New Testament Textual Space (DRAFT)


Table of Contents

Abstract
Introduction
Computing Environment
Data Sets
Analysis Methods
Ranked Distances
Classical Multidimensional Scaling (CMDS)
Divisive Clustering (DC)
Neighbour Joining (NJ)
Partitioning Around Medoids (PAM)
Analysis Results
Discussion
UBS2
UBS4
INTF General Letters
INTF Parallel Pericopes
Brooks
Cosaert
Cunningham
Donker
EFH (Ehrman, Fee, and Holmes)
Ehrman
Mullen
Osburn
Racine
Wasserman
Conclusions
What Difference Does It Make?
Acknowledgments
A. Supplementary Information
Bibliography

Note

This is a draft.

The Greek New Testament was copied by hand for almost fifteen centuries until the advent of mechanized printing provided an alternative means of propagation. Translations into other languages were produced as well. Some of these — such as the Latin, Coptic, and Syriac versions — appeared early and thus preserve ancient states of the text. Patristic citations form another class of evidence which allows varieties of the text to be associated with particular localities and epochs. Multivariate analysis of textual variation between these New Testament witnesses provides insights into their relationships to one another. Various modes of analysis can be applied, one of which allows witness locations to be plotted in a reference frame which might be called textual space.